All-West Frosh/Soph Camp: Best of the Bigs

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Nevada

Posted On: 09/28/18 3:54 PM

The annual Pangos All-West Frosh/Soph camp featured more than 200 prospects from states all across the Western United States.

The camp featured a strong mix of point guards, scoring guards, wing scorers and big men. This piece dives into the best big men from the two-day event at Westminster High.

Wilhelm Breidenbach, Mater Dei

Breidenbach was by far and away the best all-around forward/center in the event. The 6-foot-8 four-man was knocking down 3-pointers with consistency, but also had his usual impact in the paint on both ends of the floor. Breidenbach is tough, smart, fundamental and a good passer for his position.

Mater Dei forward Wilhelm Breidenbach was the best all-around big man at the Pangos All-West Frosh/Soph camp.

Kijani Wright, Windward

Wright is one of the most intriguing young center prospects coming into ninth grade as we’ve had in some time. He has good size and strength at 6-feet-9 and 210-plus pounds, but is also fairly light on his feet, extremely coordinated when changing ends of the floor and displayed soft shooting touch from the 3-point and 15-foot distances.

Nick Davidson, Santa Margarita

Davidson continues to progress at a nice pace, adding more layers to his game each time he takes the floor. The 6-foot-8 sophomore prefers to operate as a face-up four-man where he can knock in a catch-and-shoot 3-pointer or mid-range set shot, but he’s also shown flashes of what his back-to-the-basket repertoire contains.

Daniel Rouzan, Bishop Gorman (NV)

Rouzan, a 6-foot-7 sophomore, is more of your traditional type of big man who uses his big bodied frame to create space in the paint. Rouzan has soft touch with either hand in the paint, understands how to establish post position and keep a defender on his back, and he’s an active rebounder and shot blocker, defensively.

Xavier Edmonds, Cava Middle School

Edmonds has a very strong skill set for a young big man. The 6-foot-6 eighth grader has advanced footwork in the paint, soft hands when receiving an entry pass, and really nice touch with either hand. Edmonds still needs to work on his conditioning, as he had a hard time keeping up with the pace of the game for extended periods of time, but he wasn’t afraid to demand the ball on the block, which is a good sign for his future development.