Prospect Rankings Update: 2019 Top Off the Dribble Shooters

Featured
Ohio

Posted On: 08/22/17 6:00 AM

There are 121 total players included in our 2019 Prospect Rankings, all of which will be included exactly once in our week-long series, where we will segment analysis by player speciality. Throughout the entire week, you can expect articles to include a list of 10-20 players who fit a theme, with five or more individual break-downs.

Here’s the second half of our shooters section, where we highlight the players who create jumpers off the bounce.

#10 Max Martz

Martz is a confident pull-up shooter who always meets the occasion in big moments. He can rise up for pull-ups on a dime, step-back, or create space with his strength.

The Upper Arlington incoming junior received a number of D-I offers since our last update: Penn, Marist, Bowling Green, Stony Brook, and Toledo.

#15 Jeremiah Keene

As the primary ball-handler, Keene’s pull-ups in the secondary break are a game-changer. While he’s also a facilitative point guard in a lot of situations, his jumper can kill a defense’s morale in a hurry.

#27 Joey Edmonds

Edmonds received his first offer in early July, from Fairmont State. His height may be the only thing holding him back from D-I offers, as Edmonds is a skilled, competitive, and sweet stroking jump shooter. The Cincy Wyoming returning starter is something to watch when he gets hot.

#44 Ethan Collins

Collins is a flat-out scorer, he just happens to fit best in this article. His size is a factor, as guards have little chance of rejecting his above the head release. Collins uses his catch-and-shoot ability to get a step on his defender and find space in the mid-range.

If Collins can show more toughness in the lane, high D-II offers should fly in next year.

#61 Ryan Nunn

Nunn is old school in the sense that he really likes to pull-up in the mid-range more than anything. As defenders start back-peddling when he’s speeding at them, he’s a good enough athlete to just stop on a dime and hit the jumper from 17-feet. It’s incredible how many open looks Nunn creates from his favorite spot, when it’s clearly his plan of attack.

#103 Bryce Root

Root could’ve been mentioned in either one of the shooting articles. His catch-and-shoot ability (usually from the deep mid-range) allows him to pump fake and make it happen off the bounce. He’s also an interesting case in the sense that he doesn’t have a true position yet. He’s 6’2”-6’3” with a guard frame but posts-up and defends the rim at times, because of team situations and intangibles. It’ll be interesting to see how this affects his individual development and recruitment. What’s definite is that the kid can shoot it.